From Europe: reflections and ruminations
Reflections, ruminations, musings and reactions regarding
art, culture, media, politics, science and travel
8:13 pm - Mon, Jul 28, 2014
212 notes
theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

8:11 pm
50 notes
startalkradio:

Big Brain Theory: StarTalk Live! at BAM Part 1 This Sunday

If you didn’t attend StarTalk Live! at BAM earlier this year, and somebody told you that the two science guests that evening were Dr. Heather Berlin, an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience & Psychiatry, Mt. Sinai Hospital, and Mayim Bialik, who plays neuroscientist Amy Farrah Fowler on The Big Bang Theory, you might be a bit confused, for which you would understandably be forgiven.
But, as Mayim says during Part 1 of “Big Brains at BAM”, “I’m not just a neuroscientist in real life, but I play one on TV.” And she’s got the PhD to prove it.
Read More

startalkradio:

Big Brain Theory: StarTalk Live! at BAM Part 1 This Sunday

If you didn’t attend StarTalk Live! at BAM earlier this year, and somebody told you that the two science guests that evening were Dr. Heather Berlin, an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience & Psychiatry, Mt. Sinai Hospital, and Mayim Bialik, who plays neuroscientist Amy Farrah Fowler on The Big Bang Theory, you might be a bit confused, for which you would understandably be forgiven.

But, as Mayim says during Part 1 of “Big Brains at BAM”, “I’m not just a neuroscientist in real life, but I play one on TV.” And she’s got the PhD to prove it.

Read More

(via fyeah-degrasse-tyson)

9:25 pm - Sun, Jul 27, 2014
14,560 notes

underthesymmetree:

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Earth orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

Read the Book    |    Follow    |    Hi-Res    -2-    -3-    -5-    -8-

(via geometryofdopeness)

9:21 pm
120 notes

fastcodesign:

Curl up with your iPad while the archives are free

image

So far, the best thing about the New Yorker’s digital revamp is not the new site design, but rather the opening of the magazine’s storied archives. For the next three months, articles dating back to 2007 (plus select additional features) are free to all visitors, offering non-subscribers a chance to revisit some of the best design writing of the past decade.

Here are Co.Design’s picks for your weekend reading. 

(via fastcompany)

9:19 pm
117 notes
marioannosi:

Uno sguardo sul mondo.

The beginning


scattata il 24 marzo 2013

marioannosi:

Uno sguardo sul mondo.

The beginning

scattata il 24 marzo 2013

(via champagne)

9:18 pm
699 notes
9:14 pm
278 notes
thenewenlightenmentage:

'Extreme solar storm' could have pulled the plug on Earth
Satellites, power and water supplies would have been hit if billion-ton plasma cloud had erupted from sun a week earlier
The date of 23 July 2012 could have been the day the lights went out, along with suddenly not-so-smart phones, computers, satellite transmissions, GPS navigation systems, televisions, radio broadcasts, hospital equipment, electric pumps and water supplies.
On that day an “extreme solar storm” did its best to end life on Earth as we know it. The sun forced out one of the biggest plasma clouds ever detected at a speed of 3,000km per second, more than four times faster than a typical solar eruption. Fortunately it missed.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

'Extreme solar storm' could have pulled the plug on Earth

Satellites, power and water supplies would have been hit if billion-ton plasma cloud had erupted from sun a week earlier

The date of 23 July 2012 could have been the day the lights went out, along with suddenly not-so-smart phones, computers, satellite transmissions, GPS navigation systems, televisions, radio broadcasts, hospital equipment, electric pumps and water supplies.

On that day an “extreme solar storm” did its best to end life on Earth as we know it. The sun forced out one of the biggest plasma clouds ever detected at a speed of 3,000km per second, more than four times faster than a typical solar eruption. Fortunately it missed.

Continue Reading

9:12 pm
20 notes
1:48 am
147 notes
fastcompany:

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
Read More>

fastcompany:

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

image

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

5:42 am - Mon, Jul 21, 2014
379 notes

The French have all kinds of worthwhile ideas on larger matters. This occurred to me recently when I was strolling through my museum-like neighborhood in central Paris, and realized there were — I kid you not — seven bookstores within a 10-minute walk of my apartment. Granted, I live in a bookish area. But still: Do the French know something about the book business that we Americans don’t?

[…]

France … has just unanimously passed a so-called anti-Amazon law, which says online sellers can’t offer free shipping on discounted books. (“It will be either cheese or dessert, not both at once,” a French commentator explained.) The new measure is part of France’s effort to promote “biblio-diversity” and help independent bookstores compete.

[…]

The French secret is deeply un-American: fixed book prices. Its 1981 “Lang law,” named after former Culture Minister Jack Lang, says that no seller can offer more than 5 percent off the cover price of new books. That means a book costs more or less the same wherever you buy it in France, even online. The Lang law was designed to make sure France continues to have lots of different books, publishers and booksellers.

[…]

What underlies France’s book laws isn’t just an economic position — it’s also a worldview. Quite simply, the French treat books as special. Some 70 percent of French people said they read at least one book last year; the average among French readers was 15 books. Readers say they trust books far more than any other medium, including newspapers and TV. The French government classifies books as an “essential good,” along with electricity, bread and water.

Amidst America’s Amazon-drama, NYT’s Pamela Druckerman reflects on what the book world can learn from the French.

Still, one has to wonder whether the solution to one monopoly (the commercial) can ever be another (the governmental), and whether that’s truly in the public interest – the “public,” of course, being first and foremost readers themselves. There’s something hypocritical about the proposition that the books are an “essential good” on par with electricity – what government would ever price-fix electricity and deny its citizen the most affordable electricity possible?

(via explore-blog)
“The mind that lies fallow but a single day sprouts up follies that are only to be killed by a constant and assiduous culture.”
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